Senior Studio

Artwork by seniors is presented in a virtual exhibit at the Richard D. Baron ’64 Art Gallery. The Half-Time Show features video, paintings, sculptures, and mixed-media pieces.

Matterport 3D Virtual Tour: The Baron Gallery Half-time Show

Xiaoyun Gong

Within and Without, Installation

In mid-February, when there was only a single confirmed case of coronavirus in Los Angeles, a 16-year-old student was accused by another student of bringing the virus into his school from China. When he replied that he wasn’t Chinese, his classmate punched him in the head 20 times. He ended up in the emergency room.

Alison Qin

Trapped at Home. Digital photography.

Zoe Iatridis

Anchor, mixed media on canvas.

Float. Oil on canvas.

Searching for Cardinals. Oil on canvas.

Jenna Ko

This piece is about my own journey of self-discovery and navigating what it means to be an artist. The boats voyage around the white cube, interacting with the space and other artists’ pieces in it. The projection is footage of the scenic beauties of Oberlin that we often pass by. I wanted to return to a childlike perspective of attention, sensitivity, affection, amusement, and curiosity about the environment. In order to do so, I used the camera as an extension of myself. The audience is welcome to walk around the space and become part of the piece by adding origami boats. As the piece grows, the artist grows through interaction with the inspiring minds here at Oberlin.

Jenna Ko

Voyage of a Young Artist. 2020. Paint on cardboard, projection, vinyl.

Color of Love. Acrylic paint on wood.

Blue Tears 2020. Paint on papier-mâché, chicken wire, copper push pin, LED, fabric, paper, and recycling bag.

Starlight in the Lily Pond. Acrylic paint on wood.

Micaela Pirzio-Biroli

Circle Dance, Copper etching and watercolor on paper.

Liam Ashbrook

October Came and Went Without Me Noticing. Acrylic on wood board.

Meditations and Reconnection. Mixed media.

Fragments Reconstruction. Mixed media.

Micaela Pirzio-Biroli

Dancer I, II, III, and IV. Oil on wood.

Goodbye Sunshine: A Blessing for When We Part. Linoleum relief, monotype, and oil on muslin.

Maddie Shaw

Home. Acrylic on canvas.

Overboard/Overload. Acrylic on canvas and mixed media.

A Balancing Act. Acrylic on canvas.

Billy Blender

I. Mandatory Monthly COVID-19 Test Diagram; Williams Field House at Oberlin College; Oberlin, OH; Wednesday, September 16, 2020. Digital print on paper and masking tape, graphite on mylar

II. #TGIF Party Hosted by the Oberlin ’Sco (Dionysus Disco) Diagram; Wilder Bowl at Oberlin College; Oberlin, OH; Friday, October 9, 2020. Graphite on mylar

III. Voting Early for the 2020 Presidential Election Diagram; Lorain County Board of Elections; Lorain, OH; Sunday, November 1, 2020. Graphite on mylar

I. Mandatory Monthly COVID-19 Test Photo Collage; Williams Field House at Oberlin College; Oberlin, OH; Wednesday, September 16, 2020. Digital print on paper and masking tape, graphite on mylar

II. #TGIF Party Hosted by the Oberlin ’Sco (Dionysus Disco) Photo Collage; Wilder Bowl at Oberlin College; Oberlin, OH; Friday, October 9, 2020. Graphite on mylar

III. Voting Early for the 2020 Presidential Election Photo Collage; Lorain County Board of Elections; Lorain, OH; Sunday, November 1, 2020. Graphite on mylar

Retracing My Steps.

Alice Lawton

Iron. Fabric, batting, and wire.

Sit Down. Fabric, batting, and wire.

Olivia Berke

A Never-ending Collapse. Plaster cast, hose tubing, and steel.

Plank and Hoop. Mixed media

Point/Counterpoint

An Impossible Stability. Graphite on paper.

Valentina Zhang

Untitled (3). 2020. Gausses, gesso, balloon, and tulle.
Untitled (4). 2020.  Gausses, gesso, balloon, tree branch, and leaves.
Untitled (5). 2020.  Cardboard, gesso, glue gun, white paint, and tree branches.

Untitled (1). 2020. Tree branch, fishing line, white glue, and balloon.

Untitled (2). 2020. Shrub, fishing line, nail polish, balloon.

Mikaela Howard

Aversion, and Purity. Assemblage

Bridget Conway

Yes, It’s True; You Can Never Go Home Again. Wood, plexiglass, oil paint, and screenprint

24 Votes for Honey. Wood, plexiglass, and oil paint.

Grace McCallister

Corners. Ink on paper.

Mystery House. Balsa wood and cut paper.

Ivy Miller

Construction of My Mind Digital Photography, Mask: wire, fabric, thread, fake flowers, and beads. Head piece: wire, paper, string, fake flowers, and beads.

Other Student Submissions

Beaux Watwood

Mx. America, 2020

Maya McCollum

This piece is an absurdist narrative about a girl who listens closely to the world around her. As she walks home after listening to the chord change in John Cage’s 639-yearlong piece, she hears her boots squeak. When she gets home, she rigs a system where the boots become listening devices. The bottom image of the boot helps to focus the attention on the story of the object, not only that of the character. The story, written out on the right-hand side in three sections, corresponds to three elements of the print.

In the process of creating this piece, I experimented with different monotype techniques, including printing found objects, printing ghost prints with small changes to the previous plate, and transferring digital printer images onto rice paper for Chine-colle.

Maya McCollum
  1. Walking home from the concert, she hears her boots squeak. This is represented by the Chine-colle Muybridge series at the base of the top image. 
  2. She decides to create the absurd invention that she is depicted wearing. This corresponds to the abstracted boots around her ears.
  3. She decides to try the boot-earphones with a couple of her favorite records. This is represented by the record player above her head.
  1. Walking home from the concert, she hears her boots squeak. This is represented by the Chine-colle Muybridge series at the base of the top image. 
  2. She decides to create the absurd invention that she is depicted wearing. This corresponds to the abstracted boots around her ears.
  3. She decides to try the boot-earphones with a couple of her favorite records. This is represented by the record player above her head.

Products of Restlessness Series, Print 1/5. 2020. Monotype. 12.5’x 23’.

This print depicts my experience of becoming twisted around myself as I spent more and more time alone in the same space. Thoughts focusing more and more internally and perspective beginning to narrow. By placing the chair in the front corner, I intended to express an absence as well as a sense of space and home. That space has a few connection points between a private and public reality, the windows existing as the main connection with the outside world. The patterns surrounding the corners of the windows were intended to contain a sense of time and disorder, like lead paint slowly deteriorating and chipping away.

Maya McCollum

Twister for One. 1/12. 2020. woodblock reduction. 16’x16’.

This piece began with a photoshop collage using archival images of eggs, wood, and other organic materials. This was then translated into a laser cut matrix, which I used to print the black image. As I was working on this project, I was also animating collage imagery in stop motion. That process began leaking into the imagery of this print: the hands manipulating and interacting with the organic materials. This print also appears a bit like a frozen frame in an ongoing sequence, and I wanted to play with that idea further with my second block, a jigsaw which I used to print the three colors. With this second laser cut block, I drew inspiration from early color films, hand-painted frame by frame in ways that the color elements would sometimes separate from the black and white image. The tags of text contained in the print do not have any direct meaning, but are my way of drawing a connection back to the source material.

Maya McCollum

Nesting. 13/13. 2020. Laser cut woodblocks. 18’x12.25’.

Molly Thayer

My nest book is a self-portrait. Making it was an effort to find home within myself, my space, and my family. I look to color and texture for solace, and find comfort in relational aesthetics such as plaid and weaving, which I associate with my grandmothers. Working with such irregular materials is a way of healing in regards to my relationship to the spaces I inhabit. By fusing layers of transparent plastic bags, fruit sacks, and fishing rope, I composed images that represent the sometimes indecipherable layering of identity. I repeated images of nests to replicate the iterative nature of continually forming a resting place. Leaving this piece unbound and untrimmed was both a deliberate and inevitable expression of my process, highlighting the raw quality of the recycled materials I work with, and of my grappling with a sense of home.

Molly Thayer

Nest Book. 2020. Recycled materials, 7 x 14’’.

in my nest

there is color and mess

things to feel 

leaves, crumbs + thread

my feet and hands

my grandma loves bacon, plaid

and fish pillows

my other grandma was a weaver

they’re both named Barabara

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